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Right now I want to burn my connected home to the ground

03 Dec

My household is not on the bleeding edge of technology early adoption, but we’re usually in the first wave. So, when my husband switched in a new router for the one provided by our cable/internet company, I knew that we would have a lot of devices to update. At last count, those include:

  • 2 actively used laptops
  • 2 Android smartphones
  • 1 Amazon Echo
  • 3 WeMo outlets
  • 2 Nest thermostats
  • 1 Chromecast
  • 1 Fire TV stick
  • 1 printer
  • and heaven knows what else I’ve overlooked so far

Switching to a new WiFi network on a smartphone or laptop is a simple task, but connected home devices that lack a GUI are a different story. Each one follows a different process, usually involving both physically resetting the device and doing a new configuration via app or website. The Nest thermostat does have a GUI, but entering new network credentials requires the user to twist the dial back and forth like a safe cracker. It’s amusing, the first time.

I started working down the list. Laptop and phone, easy. Echo? Easy too. That’s when the fun stopped. The Nests refused to connect to the new network. The WeMo outlets, which are finicky in the best of situations, also choked. Dammit. The troubleshooting began. All have updated firmware? Check. I’m not mistyping the 10-character password? Nope. I started going through online forums and found something about 2.4 Ghz… huh? I’m not a Luddite, but my husband has taken care of our network for years and I didn’t know what I was dealing with. I sent him a message. I may have used some adult language. I asked if the new router broadcasts the same as the old one (not really having any idea what I was saying) and he muttered something about new security profiles.

Then, a short while later, he found the answer. Nest and WeMo devices don’t play well with dual band routers. In layman’s terms, they pick up both 2.4 and 5 Ghz transmissions, but their antennae aren’t “smart” enough to distinguish between them and talk back on the 2.4 band, which is the only one they can use. Tonight he’ll set up the two radios to have different SSIDs, so those devices can deal exclusively with the 2.4 Ghz frequency. Tomorrow I’ll try to move them to the new network, again, and then continue the list. [Update: phones, my laptop, and the Echo connected beautifully to the high speed band. The Nests and Kindles connected to the lower speed. The WeMo outlets? They had to be manually reset to factory default, which was a bitch, but we finally got them connected to the 2.4 Ghz band. I’ll tackle the rest tomorrow.]

There have been so many connected home devices on sale this holiday season; today I’m just grateful that my parents haven’t been tempted to buy any. No Mom, you do not need a WiFi connected crockpot. Heck, I have no idea why my otherwise awesome Anova sous vide cooker bothers having a Bluetooth connection. We don’t need to connect ALL THE THINGS.

IFTTT has great potential but is far from plug and play, and each time one technology in the network moves forward, it threatens to break every carefully constructed connection. Sometimes things that you think must work together, obviously, do not. Disenchanted with our Chromecast, I recently bought a Fire TV stick. I like its onscreen interface, but the TV is very slow to switch sources to it and the reason we replaced our router was Fire buffering. I’m warily optimistic. There is a voice controlled remote available for the Fire that contains Alexa, so I figured, gee, I bet I can control the Amazon Fire TV stick with my Amazon Echo. Silly silly me! Here is what one fellow from AFTVNews hacked together to make that work:

aftvnews-amazon-fire-tv-echo-control-flow-chart

Let’s say, that’s not mainstream consumer behavior. Full details on his set-up here.

I love technology, really I do, but I hope connected home products have a shakeup soon. A little while ago I started writing a near future science fiction story in which the main character had developed an interface layer for other devices. That interface layer operated like a true digital assistant, passing commands to the next tier of devices regardless of form or protocol. My story wasn’t very good because what I really wanted to do was daydream about that control layer. I want to be able to use natural language to control all my devices through one central AI, which can reside in a useful robotic body and also travel with me in app form. Is that too much to ask? C’mon, developers: make my story idea obsolete before I get around to writing it!

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2 Comments

Posted by on December 3, 2015 in Digital Devices

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

2 responses to “Right now I want to burn my connected home to the ground

  1. Thea Dreem

    December 4, 2015 at 1:07 pm

    Don’t you worry about The Singularity??? ;p

     
    • Kay

      December 4, 2015 at 2:03 pm

      Hehe. I’m fine with being one with my devices, or having them push me around, if they simply work better! 😉

       

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