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VWBPE conference, day 2

19 Mar

It’s the second day of the 2015 Virtual Worlds Best Practices in Education conference! One thing that I can’t help noticing: my Kay avatar has existed in Second Life for five years, which is essentially “middle aged” for this world. At VWBPE sessions, it’s not unusual for more than half of the avatars to be older than her. The amount of combined in-world experience during some discussions is awfully impressive.

getting a coffee

Starting the day with a cappuccino near the main auditorium.

I’m still seeing anxiety around a couple of items from Ebbe’s keynote during many Q&A sessions and side conversations. Poor fellow; he can’t sneeze without us analyzing it to death and wondering what it will mean for meeeeeee (I do it too!). People are concerned about his explanation that the first build tool for the Next Generation Platform (NGP) will be Autodesk’s Maya, which is very expensive and quite difficult to use. Though he did quickly say that support will be provided for other tools, including the shareware products many of us use, I can understand why it bothered a lot of people. We want to be involved in the NGP from the beginning and that high barrier of entry has diminished the potential alpha pool to a tiny privileged and knowledgeable puddle.

The other concern I’ve heard expressed numerous times is the move from Linden Scripting Language (LSL) to C# as the coding language for NGP. Honestly, I think this is a terrific move and my software engineer husband nearly burst into spontaneous applause. C# is much more robust and learning it is a portable skill. If you learned LSL, I suspect you’ll be brilliant at C#. There are a variety of free resources to learn C# online, from this Coursera class in Beginning Game Programming with C# (started 2/23), to a Microsoft Virtual Academy Programming in C# Jump Start self-paced video course (to be retired at the end of April, so hurry!), to the full set of notes and slides from Jon Jagger’s 5-day C# programming course, and many more.

On a positive note, I’m seeing a lot of excitement around Ebbe’s mention of lowering land costs: decreasing “property taxes” and increasing “sales taxes”.  Yes please.

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The first session I attended today was “Reconstructing and Navigating the Crossroads of Community” by this morning’s featured speaker, Pamela Broviak. She talked about community creation through history, based on the human drive to fulfill the levels of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. She considered communities from prehistory to Egypt, the Iroquois Confederacy, and early land distribution methods in the United States (emphasizing the importance of land ownership and how the US method diverged from the European). From there, she explored Second Life history and the differences made by zoning over time.

Pam explained that as an engineer, she is usually occupied with the lower levels of the pyramid, but her time in Second Life has made her more aware of incorporating the higher levels into her work. In fact, she no longer sees the list of needs as a hierarchy, but as a circle where lessons and experiences flow.

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The second session I was able to attend was “Gaming and Machinima at the Crossroads of Gender and Culture”. This topic was less controversial among an audience of education-related people in SL than it would be, say, on a gaming subreddit. Jakob got back from his second chemotherapy session in the middle of this session, so my attention was split for a while, but afterward I filled in what I missed by reading the notes that Sonicity kindly provided along with all of her slides.

While touching on some recent controversies around women in gaming, Sonicity talked about the violent and sexual content in popular games and what research has shown about the difference between the play styles of boys and girls. She also mentioned how “authentic storytelling” can be a game-changer (literally) and that women and girls have agency: they are a huge factor in the gaming market and can use that power. The discussion that followed was mostly about the gaming experience for younger children.

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Next, I visited the panel discussion “Quill & Quarrel: REAL Theater in a VIRTUAL World”. Over the years I’ve seen live productions in Second Life by a couple of groups, the Avatar Repertory Theater and Basilique Performing Arts Company, but I haven’t attended a performance from the Quill & Quarrel Theater.  I stayed for a while. It was a bit like a Comic-Con panel for a show I didn’t know, where the performers reminisced among themselves about past seasons I hadn’t seen. I’d really like to see something by Q&Q someday; it looks like they have A Midsummer Night’s Dream coming this spring. The panel was not as informative or useful as I had hoped, however, so I took my dog for a walk during the second half.

Then it was time for a shift as a greeter, welcoming visitors to the VWBPE Exhibition area.  I chose a quieter area; I want to help, but I am not social. Still, I had a couple of nice little conversations during my shift. The Exhibition area is certainly worth a visit. The displays are far more interesting than your usual conference booths, as you can see from the photos below:

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I have one more hour as a greeter this evening, but otherwise I’ll be offline. Tomorrow is my busy day, with six sessions I want to attend and one more greeter shift. Can’t wait!

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Posted by on March 19, 2015 in Gaming, Learning, Research

 

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